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The Rossfechten Symposium

Reviving historical equestrian and martial traditions

1-4 August 2015

The Rossfechten Symposium is a four day event bringing together enthusiasts, researchers and instructors from around the world to reconstruct historical mounted martial arts traditions using original sources from Victorian cavalry saber to medieval mounted combat 

Français

But I'm not a Fencer?

There are few better places to get a crash course in Historical Fencing than the Rossfechten Symposium, we have put great effort in bringing in some of the leading experts in Historical European Martial Arts to the Symposium, with years of experience in bringing techniques from the page of a manuscript into the heads of their pupils, we'll be teaching you the basics quickly and efficiently with an eye towards preparing you for mounted combat. They will give you the tools to become a competent fencer in as little time as possible and share their experience with pedestrian elements of their system and give valuable insights into pedagogy, academics and technique to help reconstruct the as yet mostly unplumbed mounted side of Historical European Martial Arts.

 

But I'm not a rider?

In short if you don't ride yet, and you want to do mounted combat, this is the place for you! One of our great goals with the symposium is to give beginner riders or people interested in learning to ride in order to start mounted combat an affordable means to learn the basics from experienced teachers, gain confidence, learn pitfalls and how to avoid them and make contacts that will help in continuing learning the discipline. There will be workshops for beginners in the mornings and afternoon running parallel to the other mounted workshops concentrating on riding and horsemanship fundamentals with a focus on preparation for mounted combat.

But I can't bring my Horse

There are experienced horses on site that can be rented on site, but don't wait! There's only a limited number available and places are going fast. Even if you can't bring a horse or don't want to rent there's more than enough to do, with foot workshops, lectures, historic sights and lots of interesting like minded people to meet and talk to you'll never find yourself without something to do.

An FFAMHE affiliate event

An FFAMHE affiliate event

An IFHEMA affiliate event

An IFHEMA affiliate event

More information on workshops scheduling once all instructor's travel plans have been confirmed

The  écurie Braises aux bois in the Shadow of Coucy le Chateau France lends a beautiful and rustic air to the event.

23 RUE DE LA GARE 

02700 BARISIS

www.barisis.ffe.com

Tél. : 06 07 71 4117

The Barasis aux Bois stable is a beautiful location in the heart of Picardy one of France most beautiful regions and presents hectares of fields and forest to ride through as well as several Arenas and more than enough room for our purposes including clubhouse. The stable is home to a lively and supportive community of riders. Barisis village itself is 

 

Coucy le Chateau

Barisis lies only a few kilometers from Coucy le chateau and the ruins of the castle of Coucy family one of the greatest and most energetic of the great families of France during the high middle ages, great warriors and great builders they took part in the crusades and the hundred years war and countless engagements as renowned fighters and built the largest keep of any castle in Europe to guard their strategic position blocking the northern access to Paris.-

Getting to the event

By train

The closest train station is in Tergnier, the BnB due it's rustic setting cannot be reached by public transport, if you need a pick up at a train station please inform us with your registration.

Flying In

For international travelers the best option would be flying into either the Charles de Gaulle Airport Paris or Reims airport.

 

 

 

Ferme de Brellemont

For the four days of the event Accommodations will be at the equestrian Bed and Breakfast, Ferme de Brellemont a ten minute drive from the stables. Breakfast and Dinner will be served in the dining room.

 

The BNB

There are five rooms at Brellement, most of which for three or more persons.

The Pink Room

The Blue Room

The Green Room

Orange Room

The Red Room

3 Singles Taken

1 Double Taken

1 Double 1 Single Taken

3 Single Taken

Double 3 Single

Camping 

There is room at Brellement to camp and also at the stables on request.

Stabling

stalls

There are 12 stalls, 15 Euro per night.

paddocks

Paddocks can be set up on location by participants bringing horses in the designated area, 10 Euro per night

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Food

Breakfast and lunch of cold meats and cheeses and a catered meal in the evening are provided, Monday includes a Gala. There are also facilities at Brellement for cooking for oneself.

In the Area

The Hotel Rond D'Orleans is a new hotel opening only 5m drive from the stables and they've offered us a deal to boot, 50 Euros a night plus breakfast for attendees

 

The Hotel Belle Vue in Coucy le Chateau within sight view of the castle itself is only a few minutes away from the stables, affordable and a beautiful place to boot with excellent meals.

 

General information: Jack Gassmann

If you have questions about the event in general, workshops, instructors, the website or have any suggestions, please contact me at.

rossfechtenteam@gmail.com

 

Local information: Thomas Schmuziger

For information on the area, arrivals, food, lodgings or logistics please contact Thomas at.

pan.peter@wanadoo.fr

 

Stabling and Horse Rentals: Gaelle Bernard

For information on stabling horses or horse rentals please Gaelle Bernard 

lecerfblanc@gmail.com

Workshops

 

Workshop and instructor information will be added as INSTRUCTORS send in their information and confirm travel plans

Mounted Workshops

I:33, an Experiment

Olivier Dupuis and JAck Gassmann

Description

WE WANT YOUR HELP

The more one looks at I:33's sword and buckler system and compares it to later mounted combat sources and contemporary art, the more one gets a sneaking suspicion there's more to it than meets the eye. Many of the principles seem suspiciously similar and many of the movements and guards as well.

We will begin with a short introduction to our theories and thoughts and a short discussion. Then we will start the great experiment, testing, experimenting with and developing new theories, we want you to put our ideas to the test and see whether you have new better ones even.

Riding Requirements

As always the more the better, but for the beginning maneuvers the horse will be lead, however as the fencing aspects are more established they will be combined with more advanced riding maneuvers to give a better picture of our hypothesis

Fencing requirements

We would strongly suggest that you have prior experience at least with handling weapons and with fencing theory to understand the concepts being experimented with within the workshop.

Equipment 

Weapons: one handed sword (nylon or steel), lance, a heater and a buckler. We will have a limited number of these available to loan.

Protection gear: fencing mask and padding jacket

 

Olivier Dupuis

Olivier Dupuis is on the HEMA scene since 2002 and has studied and teached a large scope of the HEMA weapons and sources (sword&buckler, staff, long sword, rapier, short stick, halberd, and so one).

He participated as instructor to some major HEMA event as Dijon (2002 to 2014 with a few pauses), Vienna (2009) and Hannover (2014)

and was an HEMAC member since 2006.

He also has an official title of “la canne” teacher delivered by the French state in 2004, something equivalent to the fencing master degree in fencing.

Flow Drills on Horseback

Mishael Lopes Cardozo

Whether on foot or on horseback control of your blade and solid body mechanics are paramount both for you and your horse's safety, one of the best ways to achieve this is flow drills. Uninterrupted patterns of movement with the sword which allow the fencer to get a feel for the movement of the sword and develop sound movement patterns that prevent injury and are useful in combat.

Mishael Lopes Cardozo

Mishaël Lopes Cardozo is founder and president of the AMEK (Academie voor Middeleeuwse Europese Krijgskunsten) www.amek.org. The academy was officially founded in 2002 and has currently six locations scattered throughout the Netherlands with approximately 175 students.

Mishaël (alias ‘Lopes’) is by origin an expert in various eastern martial arts. Since 1992 he has been exclusively focusing on the research and practice of European medieval martial arts. In 2008 Mishaël started his international HEMA career and he has taught at more then 20 international HEMA events. He currently teaches all over the world. More over is he is a tough tournament fighter and won several gold medals in international tournaments. The AMEK Fight team is one of the most successful HEMA Fight teams in the world.

Mishaël’s primary focus is 15th century German fighting tradition, and secondary is Italian dagger and wrestling tradition. His other specialism is the designing and execution of ‘flow drills’ with one weapon and two weapons. One of his latest research projects involved the find, transcription and interpretation of a Dutch dagger fighting manual PBL 3281.

On July 12th 2008 Mishaël was officially knighted in Holland for his contribution to the reconstruction of the historical European martial heritage. In 2010 Mishaël’s initiated and co-founded the HEFFAC ‘Historical European Fighting and Fencing Arts Coalition’, a lowlands martial arts alliance, consisting out of the leading historical martial arts schools located in the Netherlands en Belgium. He organised the first three HEFFAC events 2010/2011/2012.

Besides teaching Mishaël is in demand for film and TV as an actor and fight choreographer and he does Motion Capture for computer games. His two latest project the motion picture ‘Richard the Lionheart Rebellion’, where he is plays the role of William Marshall and the mega series Game of Thrones where he will appear in season V episode III.

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Riding requirements

Horses that cannot be ridden easily one handed will be lead, the horse may be wary of moving weapons but should not be shying from them.

Fencing Requirements

Although all levels are accepted a good control of the weapon is required for moving on to horseback.

Equipment

Longsword or single handed sword.

Maximum number of participants

10

Foundation

Alessia Pagani

First let me start out by thanking you for your interest in participating my workshop. I hope this description helps to provide some details on what to expect.

My goal will be to help you find a friendship with your horse - to help him learn by using the instinctional, natural language of the horse and not forcing him with gimmicks or pressure, trying to do always less, not more.

This workshop, will have a “step-by-step” program consisting of  working from groundwork on up to riding and how they are relate; it will be applicable to all riding disciplines, style and outfits.

The crucial point is the light connection to the horse’s feet and mind; as with all sports basics are critical: Micheal Jordan once said “90% of my practice is basics. It’s from perfect basics that all the fancy moves come from”. Here, we will work on basics and how they can help you to go through the manouvers you will need whether it’s mounted combat, trail riding, dressage, jumping, reining, cow working etc..

The key is the feet. Controlling the feet with feel and timing; when you understand where the feel is and you are in rythm with those feet, you can stop a foot before it gets in trouble, you can pick up that foot, set it down, you can speed it up or slow it down. It sounds really basic but when you go on a horse you need to feel where those feet are and be in time with them for get to the mind of your horse.

Please do not hesitate to contact me if you have any additional questions.

Investigating armored Mounted Combat

Thomas Schmutziger

Riding requirements

None

Fencing Requirements

None

Equipment

Snaffle bit, halter and lead rope

Maximum number of participants

10

Rarely are principles or tactics of mounted combat explicitly discussed in the sources, however the practice of combat in light or war armour is often illustrated. Most effort of modern practitioners has focussed on tournament practice, the joust or the melee.

The workshop is meant take a more hands on approach focusing on the sources dealing with armoured techniques working directly from the sources.

The objective of the workshop is to examine the sources from the point of view of the participants. We will be discussing everybody’s interpretations of the sources, but also discussing the limitations that wearing armor imposes.

Thomas Schmutziger

Thomas Schmutziger has been active in HEMA and riding for over 10 years, is trainer for the fencing group Claire de Lame and founder of the show group "la compagnie de qui" which focuses on accurately representing 13th century mounted combat. Together with Gaelle Bernard he specializes in reconstructing 13th century mounted combat and riding, but also work with 15th century armored sources. To this end they organize the Tournois à XIII every year, to experiment with tournament and combat manouvers 

Riding requirements

You must be able to control the horse at all gaits one handed. The horse must be fine with proximity to other horses and not fire The horse must not react aggressively to horses coming close to him.

Fencing Requirements

The pace of the workshop will be somewhat leisured as sources will be consulted often, but participants need still be fit enough to work for extended periods of time in armor. The fencing skills need be high enough to work with the sources, so at least a basic familiarity with sword and lance is required. 

Equipment

Priority is given to the attendees with full armor. If a participant doesn't have full armor, he requires at the least, a helmet (barbute, pot-helm, sallet or visor), a pair of steel gloves, a protective vest (gambeson, HEMA jacket or of course breastplate) and a pair of solid knee protectors.

Basic simulators are provided, nylons and lance staves. If the participant has his own weapon he can bring it.

Maximum number of participants

10


Playing your way to Rossfechten

Jack Gassmann

Making the step to Rossfechten can sometimes feel like a huge leap both for you and your horse and merely desensitizing your horse to the weapon and doing endless laps in the arena is sometimes not enough nor does it seem very appealing after a long workday. I will be working with different games that can be done both as a group and individually for getting horse and rider to work smoothly as a team and slowly building up you and your horses ability to handle more stressful situations, while making that hard earned riding time more fun for both horse and rider.

JAck GAssmann

Jack Gassmann is instructor and co-founder of the Swiss Club Artes Certaminis, he specializes in German Longsword in Liechtenauer's mounted combat and is a successful international HEMA competitor and teaches at international events. He also practices Fiore dagger and sabre. He instructs Plains Indian archery, working with surviving Lakota families and original sources.

Riding requirements

A basic ability to control your horse at the trot is required as well as a certain amount of desensitization to moving objects. The horse must not react aggressively to horses coming close to him.

Fencing Requirements

None

Equipment

Helmet and knee protections. A historical saddle can make things even more interesting.  

Maximum number of participants

8


The horse wrestling of Paul-Hector Mair

BAS PIERRE-HENRY (REGHT

Description

Paul-Hector Mair (XVIth century) shows many mounted wrestling pieces wrestling on horseback (21 plates). Even if the illustrations come often from Georg Wilhelm's work, the interpretations are original or are based on the mounted wrestling of the Liechtenauer tradition. The goal of this workshop is to understand two types of position: firstly, in front of your opponent. Secondly, beside to him. What this position means for you and what can you do. We will see exercises and games in order to work approaches and some tactical points. True falls are not planned at this time...

 

Riding requirements

Riders should be secure in their seat.

Ideally with a horse sociable with others horses, who responds to legs and can be directed only with one hand.

Fencing Requirements

None

Equipment

Helmet and knee protections. A historical saddle can make things even more interesting.  

Maximum number of participants

10


The Lance, more than just a stick

THOMAS SCHMUTZIGER AND JACK GASSMANN

Both the Italian and German traditions treat the lance as an independent weapon system, far from pointing and hoping, these traditions describe attacks and counters that strive to displace the enemy lance while bringing your own into position for a solid strike. We will be examining and practicing some of the many techniques that can be found in the source material.

JACK GASSMANN

Jack Gassmann is instructor and co-founder of the Swiss Club Artes Certaminis, he specializes in German Longsword in Liechtenauer's mounted combat and is a successful international HEMA competitor and teaches at international events. He also practices Fiore dagger and sabre. He instructs Plains Indian archery, working with surviving Lakota families and original sources.

Riding requirements

Must be able to direct a horse at least at a walk one-handed with good control, lateral movements are encouraged but not necessary. The better you can ride the more you can do here.

Fencing Requirements

Must have good control of the lance at the walk and trot, especially good point awareness is important for safety reasons.

Equipment

Fencing masks or helmets with a face-plate plus some kind of chest protector are required, lances can be provided.

Maximum number of participants

10

THOMAS SCHMUTZIGER

Thomas Schmutziger has been active in HEMA and riding for over 10 years, is trainer for the fencing group Claire de Lame and founder of the show group "la compagnie de qui" which focuses on accurately representing 13th century mounted combat. Together with Gaelle Bernard he specializes in reconstructing 13th century mounted combat and riding, but also work with 15th century armored sources. To this end they organize the Tournois à XIII every year, to experiment with tournament and combat manouvers 


Positioning your horse

Jan BEzemer

Show some things I have been working on and try to get your horse in the right place at right moment. Trying it out together and looking what works best. 

During my work I have lots of time watching and playing with horses and just try things out. It will be and experimental setting, in trying together at what level are the horses and what will work, and what has to be trained on.

Jan Bezemer

I am a qualified riding instructor and having my work with horses and special people. Now already for 10 Years, tried to get into longsword but it did not work out, I live to far away form most HEMA groups.   Then I found out Rossfechten, and starting to get involved in that.
So that’s why I got into HEMA on horseback. And that is slowly getting some horses trained to a level and I am figuring out some things that works and other things that does not work.
As not being a good fencer I have to get my riding do the skills and at all times get out of bad situations and take advantage of the good ones.

Minimum Riding requirements

Good seat, preferable one handed in all gaits, but we will see where we can come anybody can join with a Horse

Minimum Fencing Requirements

None, some skills will help understand what is done, and why.

Equipment

none

Maximum number of participants

10


From the Ground up

In western horsemanship traditions, groundwork played an essential role in the education of a horse. Already in the thirteenth century, Jordanus Rufus mentions the presence of a ‘conductor’ who is able to send the horse in left and right handed circles, the sixteenth century founding father of academic dressage Frederico Grisone speaks about adjusting the horse with the end of the lead rope, and in the eighteenth century Johann Elias Ridinger stresses that horses should first be conducted on a lead rope without any resistance before any more advanced work can be started. Regretfully, these European groundwork traditions did not survive the revolutionary period around 1800 and the surviving works of the old European masters contain little practical information as to how this groundwork was precisely executed. Nonetheless, their groundwork goals appeared similar to what American vaqueros and buckaroos hope to achieve with their basic groundwork. These methods, therefore, offer an interesting complementarity to educate horses for Rossfechten purposes.

                  This workshop will explore the basic groundwork that vaqueros undertake and will demonstrate how such methods build up fundamental and applied qualities which are central to mounted combat. More concretely, this workshop will focus on building confidence, pursuing lightness in the aids and achieving a basic form of agility. Furthermore, it will indicate how these basics can be furthered towards the more advanced groundwork which can be found in the works of traditional dressage masters such as Pluvinel, Cavendish or de la Guerinière

Minimum Riding requirements

No prior knowledge required, exercises tailored to level

Minimum Fencing Requirements

Not Applicable

Equipment

Halter (preferably ropehalter) or Mcarthy, long lead or lunge rope (between 3-3.5m), driving tool such as flag, horse whip or stick is suggested, but not necessary if the lead rope is solid, lunging whips are not feasible for the exercises.

Maximum number of participants

10

XAVIER BAECKE

The ancient traditions related to medieval knighthood always fascinated Xavier, not only as an academic pursuit, but also as a practical endeavour. Such an endeavour culminates in the reconstruction of medieval equestrian martial practices, a central aspect of knightly culture. Xavier hopes to bring a combination of different fields of expertise – as a HEMA instructor, a student of horsemanship and a professional historian – to this new discipline of HEMA (Historical European Martial Arts) and equitation.

                  As a HEMA instructor in SwArta (Belgium), Xavier has been researching, practicing and teaching medieval wrestling, dagger and longsword combat for nearly a decade, mostly specializing in the Lichtenauer tradition. Furthermore, he has been studying and practicing several western horsemanship traditions (vaquero/buckaroo and traditional dressage) for several years as a stepping stone to the reconstruction of medieval horsemanship and Rossfechten (leading to the Scholae Artis Equestris project). His work on HEMA and horsemanship is further enhanced by Xavier’s professional expertise as a biologist and as a historian. Especially his current research as a medievalist at Ghent University, focusing on knighthood in the High Middle Ages, as well as his study of western horsemanship traditions which originated from medieval horsemanship, have influenced his insights on medieval horsemanship and Rossfechten practices. With his varied expertise, Xavier hopes to contribute to revitalizing a martial and equestrian tradition that has left a distinct mark on European history: the Rossfechten of the medieval knight.


Skill at Arms

The SAA workshop will teach the basic horsework for Skill at Arms and Rossfechten, cut down into easy parts that the participants can take home and train, so they and their mounts are working further towards tournaments and shows

Peter Als Nerving

Peter als Nerving, sword/combat Instructor at Laurentiusgildet East in Denmark, has spent his entire life studying martial arts and has devoted the last years to understanding Europe's lost martial arts, he has been working with horses for 20 odd years, doing a lot of different horsework from full contact jousting, reenacting and down, he is enjoying old age now mostly with skill at arms and sword fighting.

Minimum Riding requirements

Comfortable in walk and Trot

Minimum Fencing requirements

none 

Equipment

A sword simulator (there will be a number of swords and weapons that can be loaned out from the event)

Maximum number of Participants

10


Dismounted Workshops

 

19th Century Lance Training of the French Cavalry

Julien Garry

Minimum Riding requirements

Not Applicable

Minimum Fencing Requirements

Not Necessary

Equipment

  Mask, gloves and jacket, and a lance simulator (2m minimum), I have some wooden lance simulator

Maximum number of participants

30

Teaching lance techniques on foot as would have been taught in a cavalry barracks during the XIXe!
The main idea on a cavalry training field in France, is : before fencing on horseback, a soldier has to be a good rider and a good fencer. And only after, can he fight on horseback with reduced risk.
Also for learn mounted lance, we need to become good with lance on foot. So this workshop’s purpose is to try lance techniques with the same method applying them on foot, and a few more developed exercises.


From Bloss to Ross

For Johannes Lichtenauer, Blossfechten was the beginning of all other forms of fighting. The basic principles, the dynamics and the techniques all start with Blossfechten and are then applied to and adapted for the disciplines of Rossfechten and Kampffechten. Understanding and performing Rossfechten therefore preconditions good skills at Blossfechten.

                  This workshop will focus on particular elements of Blossfechten in the Lichtenauer Tradition and explore how they relate to Rossfechten. Depending on the progress made in the workshop, several elements may be explored in a  dynamic and sparring based way: the relation between Lichtenauer’s motus and the horse’s tempo; Fechten nach der blossen, its implication as to the ‘line of approach’ and the measure in space; the principle of versetzen and absetzen in relation to the shielhau and tashenhau; the principle of durchwechselen in Blossfechten and in Rossfechten; the principle of durchlaufen in Blossfechten and in RossfechtenFuhlen in des: the question of windenzucken or umschlagen, foot work in the abzug from Bloss to Ross.

Minimum Riding requirements

Not Applicable

Minimum Fencing Requirements

Experience with the Lichtenauer tradition and Longsword and should at least be familiar with most of the mentioned techniques

Equipment

 Weapons: sword (Feders are preferred, nylons may be used but will render some problems, iron swords can be used with care and enough protection); long stick (to simulate a lance)

Protection: helmet and gloves are obligatory, fencing jacket is advisable. 

Maximum number of participants

20

Xavier BAecke

The ancient traditions related to medieval knighthood always fascinated Xavier, not only as an academic pursuit, but also as a practical endeavour. Such an endeavour culminates in the reconstruction of medieval equestrian martial practices, a central aspect of knightly culture. Xavier hopes to bring a combination of different fields of expertise – as a HEMA instructor, a student of horsemanship and a professional historian – to this new discipline of HEMA (Historical European Martial Arts) and equitation.

                  As a HEMA instructor in SwArta (Belgium), Xavier has been researching, practicing and teaching medieval wrestling, dagger and longsword combat for nearly a decade, mostly specializing in the Lichtenauer tradition. Furthermore, he has been studying and practicing several western horsemanship traditions (vaquero/buckaroo and traditional dressage) for several years as a stepping stone to the reconstruction of medieval horsemanship and Rossfechten (leading to the Scholae Artis Equestris project). His work on HEMA and horsemanship is further enhanced by Xavier’s professional expertise as a biologist and as a historian. Especially his current research as a medievalist at Ghent University, focusing on knighthood in the High Middle Ages, as well as his study of western horsemanship traditions which originated from medieval horsemanship, have influenced his insights on medieval horsemanship and Rossfechten practices. With his varied expertise, Xavier hopes to contribute to revitalizing a martial and equestrian tradition that has left a distinct mark on European history: the Rossfechten of the medieval knight.

Limited spaces available

Basic package 145 Euro 

Full access to workshops, breakfast, lunch and dinner included, as well as a small welcome packet.

Please help us by filling out following information

Name *
Name
Billing Information *
Further arrangements will be worked out over Email. If neither of these options is possible for you please contact us and we will arrange an alternative mode of payments.
For family and partners who aren't taking part in the workshops, 60 Euro per guest.
Paddocks can be set up onsite, 10 Euro per night per horse
There are 12 stalls available at 15 Euro per night.
Rental horse
Will you be wanting to rent a horse? There are 6 available from the stable. please contact lecerfblanc@gmail.com
There will be a big Barnum tent available for camping, out in upon request as well as the option of bringing your own tent.
Will you be needing a pick up?
For further details please contact us.
Arrival
Arrival
If you are not sure what day you will be arriving leave this blank

Horse Rentals

If you're traveling from far away, don't have a horse or would just prefer to ride a horse that is not green to Rossfechten renting a horse might be a good idea. The stable at Blancs Draps has 6 horse available to rent at 26 Euro per workshop, for further information and arrangements please contact Gaelle Bernard

Lectures

 

Reconstructing Medieval Horsemanship

Xavier Baecke

Recent historical studies demonstrated that an advanced level of horsemanship was of paramount importance for the medieval knight and nobleman. Furthermore, medieval fencing manuals indicate that good horsemanship often determined the success or failure of the fight.  In light of this evidence, it is remarkable that there are no medieval sources which inform us in a detailed way about the training of horses, posing a fundamental problem for the modern reconstruction of medieval mounted combat. In this lecture, I will explore the history of western horsemanship in order to formulate an appropriate answer to this problem.

                  Although medieval sources do not provide us with any concrete technical information about the training of horses, the analysis of these sources enable us to determine the ‘applied qualities’ necessary for Rossfechten. Furthermore, by studying the history of western horsemanship traditions which originated from medieval horsemanship, most notably traditional dressage and the vaquero tradition, we can assess their use for the reconstruction of medieval horsemanship. As a result, this lecture will propose a reconstructive method based on a retrogressive and comparative analysis of traditional western horsemanship practices, while also indicating the complexity and possible pitfalls of such a method.